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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of Methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents found in the catalog.

Methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents

Methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents

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Published by OECD in Paris .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nuclear reactor accidents -- Economic aspects -- Computer simulation.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementNuclear Energy Agency, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
    ContributionsOECD Nuclear Energy Agency.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination114 p. :
    Number of Pages114
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18388349M
    ISBN 109264176586

    Relocation should be used sparingly if at all after a major nuclear accident. • 3 diverse methods support this: J-value, optimal economic control and PACE-COCO2. • Remediation will be cost-effective after a major nuclear accident. • The J-value method has been validated against pan-national data. •Cited by: 8.   The development and consequences of hypo thetical accidents to PWRs were analysed on a probabilistic basis in the USNRC "Reactor Safety StudyO f these accidents, the sequence designated PWR9 approximates to the "design basis accident" (dba) or "maximum credible accident" (mca) and is perhaps the analogue of the depressurisation accident for the.

    METHODOLOGY FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF INNOVATIVE NUCLEAR REACTORS AND FUEL CYCLES: (FIRST PART) OF THE INTERNATIONAL PROJECT ON INNOVATIVE NUCLEAR REACTORS AND FUEL CYCLES (INPRO) IAEA, VIENNA, IAEA-TECDOC ISBN 92–0––5 of the INPRO method for the assessment of nuclear energy systems was . Selected References 1. OECD/NEA (), Methodologies for Assessing the Economic Consequences of Nuclear Reactor Accidents, Paris, France 2. ICRP (), Recommendations of the ICRP, ICRP Publication , Ann. ICRP 37 () 3. ICRP (), Report of ICRP Task Group 84 on Initial Lessons Learned from the Nuclear.

    A nuclear and radiation accident is defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as "an event that has led to significant consequences to people, the environment or the facility". Examples include lethal effects to individuals, radioactive isotope to the environment, or reactor core melt." The prime example of a "major nuclear accident" is one in which a reactor core is damaged and. A computer model (CRAC) was developed for the Reactor Safety Study (WASH) (1) to estimate the consequences of postulated accidents at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. One hundred reactors at 68 sites were included in the study.


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Methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents Download PDF EPUB FB2

Boundaries and limitations of the estimation of economic consequences. The evaluation of economic consequences of nuclear accidents is subject to a number of limiting conditions, in space and time, as well as to other limitations due to the nature of the specific items being evaluated.

Radiation Protection Methodologies for Assessing the Economic Consequences of Nuclear Reactor Accidents by Published by: OECD Publishing (Author)Author: Published by: OECD Publishing. For this reason, the NEA created an expert group to investigate the methodologies used in calculating the economic consequences of accidents, and the bases for such methodologies.

Calculation methods were assessed according to three end uses: for compensation and liability purposes; for accident preparedness and management purposes; and for making electricity-generation choices.

Joint NDC/CRPPH expert group on the methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents --Scope of the report --Report organisation and structure --Cost elements for consequence assessment models --Definitions in the evaluation of economic consequences --Boundaries and limitations of the estimation of economic.

the economic assessment of the risks of nuclear accidents. We will emphasize on its major drawbacks and on the policy guidelines this assessment entails.

Risks of accidents are often quantified by the assessment of their expected costs [1]; that is the product of damage by the probability of occurrence.

In the caseAuthor: Romain Bizet, François Lévêque. 3 See for example, OECD-NEA, Methodologies for Assessing the Economic Consequences of Nuclear Reactor Accidents, 4 See section 8 below. In general, an image effect occurs when the public turns its back on a product because of more or less unfounded fears which globally constitute the loss of reputation of the product.

5 See section 9 below. Study on the Methodology of Assessing Accident Risk Costs for Nuclear Power Plants Yuji Matsuo* Summary This paper summarized past estimations of nuclear accident risk costs in Japan and other countries and made relevant discussions.

So far, two methods have been proposed for calculating nuclear accident risk costs. One computes an. Chernobyl accident: consequences and lessons Aspects of assessing consequences of nuclear accidents In the analysis of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident and their mitigation (ACM) additionally to the scientific and technical aspects the factors of political and socio-economic nature must also be considered.

Methodologies for Assessing the Economic Consequences of Nuclear Reactor Accidents OECD and Nuclear Energy Agency This report investigate the methodologies used in calculating the economic consequences of accidents, and the bases for such methodologies. The table below is an updated version of a similar table in IEER’s report, The Nuclear Power Deception (), which has more information on nuclear reactors and reactor accidents.

Nuclear Reactor Accidents Reactor type Location Accident type Year Iodine release, curies Comments Light water reactor, BWR Fukushima, Japan Cooling system failure, hydrogen explosion [ ].

The economic risk of a nuclear accident is one of major concerns in a country with operating nuclear power plants. This study attempted to assess economic damages from a hypothetical accident at a nuclear power plant in Korea although it is not exhaustive by focusing on the cost of evacuation and radiological health effects.

A probabilistic. The IAEA lists 3 accidents labelled 5, including the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident in the USA and the Windscale Fire in the UK 1 (IAEA, ).

There is very little work done on the economic valuation of nuclear accidents and as I argue in more detail below, most of this work is inappropriate in terms of its economic Size: KB. Get this from a library. Methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents.

[OECD Nuclear Energy Agency.;] -- For practical reasons, the consequences of nuclear reactor accidents are often measured in economic terms.

Figures currently available, however, show significant discrepancies. For this reason, the. For practical reasons, the consequences of nuclear reactor accidents are often measured in economic terms.

Figures currently available, however, show significant discrepancies. For this reason, the NEA created an expert group to investigate the methodologies used in calculating the economic consequences of accidents, and the bases for such methodologies.

Get this from a library. Methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency.;] -- For practical reasons, the consequences of nuclear reactor accidents are often measured in economic terms.

Figures currently available, however, show significant discrepancies. For this reason, the. Methodologies for assessing the economic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents.; Méthodes d'évaluation des conséquences économiques des accidents nucléaires: Description: Online-Ressource.

Series Title: Nuclear development and radiation protection; SourceOECD: Responsibility. COCO-2 is a model for assessing the potential economic costs likely to arise off-site following an accident at a nuclear reactor.

COCO-2 builds on work presented in the model COCO-1 developed in by considering economic effects in more detail, and by including more sources of loss. Of particular note are: the consideration of the directly affected local economy, indirect losses that stem.

The results are discussed in Section 5 in terms of the accidents at Three Mile Island 2, Chernobyl and Fukushima Dai-ichi; comparable accidents from a modern Gen III+ reactor and a brief consideration of future calculations which could be performed by PACE to assess countermeasure interventions, and corresponding economic costs, across by: 9.

This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals how to mitigate potential risks to the public to the maximum extent possible.

Show less This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that. As underlined in the previous NEA study, “Methodologies for Assessing the Economic Consequences of Nuclear Reactor Accidents”, the methodologies adopted, along with the cost elements these can consider and combine, greatly depend upon the objective of the cost study and the intended use of the resulting “accident cost” figures.

Reactor Safety Study: An Assessment of Accident Risks in U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants [NUREG/ (WASH)].The explosion on 26 April at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the consequent reactor fire resulted in an unprecedented release of radioactive material from a nuclear reactor and adverse consequences for the public and the environment.

Although the accident occurred nearly two decades ago, controversy still.Abstract: This chapter presents current regulations to ensure safety and reliability of ageing nuclear power plants.

Management of ageing in structures, systems and components requires an understanding of ageing mechanisms and how to detect and control them through surveillance, feedback of operating experience and maintenance programmes.

nuclear power plants’ longer-term operation needs to.